Short film – Fauve http://fauve.info/ Mon, 16 May 2022 06:15:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fauve.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Short film – Fauve http://fauve.info/ 32 32 NASA calls for entries for its CineSpace short film competition https://fauve.info/nasa-calls-for-entries-for-its-cinespace-short-film-competition/ Mon, 16 May 2022 06:15:07 +0000 https://fauve.info/nasa-calls-for-entries-for-its-cinespace-short-film-competition/ Whether you’re an experienced filmmaker or an enthusiastic newbie, NASA invites everyone to enter this year’s CineSpace Short Film Contest. Highlighted in a post on the International Space Station’s Twitter account on Sunday, the annual competition encourages creatives around the world to make a short film featuring footage from NASA’s own archives. Filmmakers: submissions from […]]]>

Whether you’re an experienced filmmaker or an enthusiastic newbie, NASA invites everyone to enter this year’s CineSpace Short Film Contest.

Highlighted in a post on the International Space Station’s Twitter account on Sunday, the annual competition encourages creatives around the world to make a short film featuring footage from NASA’s own archives.

Filmmakers: submissions from @NASA-inspired films are open until July 15 for the 2022 CineSpace Short Film Competition organized by @cinemaHTX! 🎥 Visit https://t.co/wpv6L83th9 for more details and enter via @Tongales: https://t.co/Tk941pXlzy pic.twitter.com/5yDQg0gHo4

— International Space Station (@Space_Station) May 15, 2022

Organized by NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society, entries for the competition are open through July 15, 2022.

Entries can be of any genre and on any topic and you can submit up to five different films. The length must not exceed 10 minutes and at least 10% of the film must use NASA archival footage.

“With more than 60 years of space exploration at your fingertips – from the first Apollo flights to the latest rover shots – your mission is to flex your creative muscles and create something truly unique,” the space agency said on the contest website.

“Using NASA imagery, we seek out films of any type and format – i.e. traditional narratives, experiential expressions, documentaries, comedies, dramas, animated plays, ambient visuals, music videos, remixes, VJ sets, even sci-fi or horror stories, and more. The main thing is that your short film is based on innovative and artistic storytelling , elicits an emotional response and exhibits mastery of directing, editing and/or animation.

Last year’s winner (below), Daydreamtells the story of a 30-year-old woman still living at home with her overbearing mother who escapes her oppressive life by creating an imaginary world in which she pretends to be an astronaut.

Its Belgium-based creators, Isil Bengi and Laurens Heijs, won a cash prize for their efforts, and the film was subsequently screened at film festivals across the United States, as well as in schools, museums and libraries – and even aboard the International Space Station.

Waking Dream (CineSpace 2021 First Place Winner) from the Houston Cinema Arts Society on Vimeo.

Finalists for NASA’s CineSpace Short Film Competition will be announced in October, and an awards ceremony will be held at the Houston Cinema Arts Festival the following month.

Along with the Best Film award, an additional cash prize will be awarded to the creator of the film that best portrays the theme of diversity and inclusion, and another for an educational film that effectively inspires young people to join STEM ( science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

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Georgian filmmaker releases short film about mental health https://fauve.info/georgian-filmmaker-releases-short-film-about-mental-health/ Sun, 15 May 2022 03:25:35 +0000 https://fauve.info/georgian-filmmaker-releases-short-film-about-mental-health/ ATHENS, Ga. Pamela Perrine has been making short films since moving to Watkinsville about six years ago, and now her latest effort is available to the public on YouTube. “The Journeyman”, which Perrine directed and wrote, has already screened at four film festivals. One of the reasons she wants the short to be available now […]]]>

Pamela Perrine has been making short films since moving to Watkinsville about six years ago, and now her latest effort is available to the public on YouTube.

“The Journeyman”, which Perrine directed and wrote, has already screened at four film festivals.

One of the reasons she wants the short to be available now is that May is National Mental Health Awareness Month.

The film “deals with childhood trauma and not being believed, which is one of the mental health issues – how patients are not believed and how they are misdiagnosed,” he said. she stated.

“The Journeyman” stars Jay Mohr, who has been an actor since 1992 and has had roles in films such as “Jerry Maguire” and the TV series “The Cleaning Lady.”

“I knew Jay Mohr and wanted to use his amazing acting skills,” Perrine said.

The 11.5-minute film was reviewed in Indie Shorts Magazine:

“Pamela Perrine’s The Journeyman is a multi-layered social drama that advances discussions of mental health, societal rehabilitation and childhood trauma in a tight, dual narrative. But if you thought the film could be compartmentalized into one of many stories dealing with mental health, you couldn’t be more wrong. At its heart, The Journeyman is about love, compassion, and perhaps even a silent message to all whose voices are never heard,” the reviewer said.

“All of my movies are usually about moral dilemmas and family dramas. I brought mental health into this one because I feel like it’s important — because it’s so overlooked,” said Perrin.

The film premiered in Hollywood at the Chinese Film Festival, then was accepted at the Chelsea Film Festival in New York, the Vail Film Festival in Colorado, and the Portland Film Festival, the latter of which screens films from around the world.

Also available on YouTube is a short film Perrine shot in Watkinsville in 2018 titled “Angels in Rocket Field.” Many scenes were filmed on Rocket Field downtown.

Perrine, a native of the Macon area, began an acting career in 1991 and lived in California and New York before moving to Watkinsville. She plans to make a feature film.

Another short film she directed and acted in was released in 2020.

“Lunchtime with the President,” she said, is her favorite short. It was accepted into an Oscar-qualifying film festival and was well received.

“It’s really powerful,” she said.

“Ultimately, it alludes to Abraham Zapruder, who filmed the JFK assassination,” the director said.

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New Jersey Short Film Festival Highlights Local Artists and Themes https://fauve.info/new-jersey-short-film-festival-highlights-local-artists-and-themes/ Tue, 10 May 2022 09:02:33 +0000 https://fauve.info/new-jersey-short-film-festival-highlights-local-artists-and-themes/ WESTAMPTON – Watch out, moviegoers. The first Burlington County Film Festival is scheduled for this month with two feature films spotlighting New Jersey’s beloved Pinelands. The two-day juried short film festival will be held May 12-13 at the Burlington County Library, 5 Pioneer Blvd., Westampton. Twenty-seven films will be screened starting at 5 p.m., including […]]]>
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10 questions to the actors of the short film Mosaic Street https://fauve.info/10-questions-to-the-actors-of-the-short-film-mosaic-street/ Mon, 09 May 2022 08:15:41 +0000 https://fauve.info/10-questions-to-the-actors-of-the-short-film-mosaic-street/ Yuki Matsuzaki has an old but relevant thing to say about the oft-repeated idea that Japan is one of the most homogeneous nations on the planet: “Hogwash.” A Hollywood actor for over 20 years, Matsuzaki has appeared in Letters from Iwo Jima, Pirates of the Caribbean: Fountain of Youth, The Pink Panther 2 and many […]]]>

Yuki Matsuzaki has an old but relevant thing to say about the oft-repeated idea that Japan is one of the most homogeneous nations on the planet: “Hogwash.” A Hollywood actor for over 20 years, Matsuzaki has appeared in Letters from Iwo Jima, Pirates of the Caribbean: Fountain of Youth, The Pink Panther 2 and many other productions. Sadly, her experiences also include times when she was told her waist or hair didn’t look “authentic” Japanese.

After more than two decades of this, the actor has concluded that the world has too narrow a definition of what it means to be Japanese. So he decided to fix this problem the only way he knew how: through film. The result was the crime drama short of 2022 Mosaic Street. Written by Matsuzaki and directed by Shiho Fukada, it celebrates the diversity of modern Japan by featuring openly transgender actress Kota Ishijima, openly lesbian actress Ami Ide and Afro-Japanese actress Ema Grace in the lead roles.

We recently spoke to the cast of Mosaic Street to find out more about the film and the current state of Japanese entertainment.

1. Where did the idea for Mosaic Street come from?

Matsuzaki: I had been aware of the lack of diversity in the Japanese entertainment industry for quite some time and always wondered what I could do to change that. When I saw Kota’s documentary the Butterflyit made me wonder why a talented actress like her didn’t have a fair chance in the industry.

So, I casually asked her if she would be interested in creating a demo tape to show it to the world. She has accepted. Then it occurred to me that I might as well represent the least represented minorities in Japanese industries: transgender women, lesbians, and mixed-race Japanese. So I asked Ami and Ema if they would be interested in joining the project. They agreed. That’s how it started.

2. What attracted you to the film?

Ishijima: I grew up in Japan, England, America and India while attending 17 schools. I suffered prejudice when I was outside of Japan. However, when I was back in Japan, I was also treated as a “foreigner” because of my behavior. I struggled with my sexuality since childhood. I was alone for a long time and I was impressed by [Yuki’s] passion for the representation of minorities in Japan. He really understands the sensitivity and the difficulty of being a transgender actress. Yuki’s typhoon-like ability for action is second to none, but as you can see, he’s created an extremely sensitive film.

Kota Ishijima as Takanori Tokudome

3. What do you hope Mosaic Street will accomplish?

Matsuzaki: I really hope Mosaic Street can change the way people in the Japanese entertainment industry think about how minorities should be portrayed in movies and TV shows. They need to know that it’s okay to cast them for “normal” Japanese roles. They don’t have to find a “reason” to include them. Just choose them for the roles they have. If this happens, then there will be more opportunities for minority actors in Japan and they can become role models for minorities in Japan.

Idea: I always wanted to be the change I wanted to see in the world. I hoped Mosaic Street would give younger generations the idea that we can do whatever we want, even if you’re not “normal” in Japan.

4. Is there a reason why the characters in the movie alternate between fluent Japanese and English?

Matsuzaki: The reason the cast speaks both English and Japanese is because I wanted to prove to the world, and to the Japanese industry, that Japan is capable of creating compelling English-language content. If we start creating more content like this, I’m sure Japan will be able to compete in the global market.

Ema Grace as Wakaba Mitarai

5. Do you think that Japan itself is also responsible for this “one size fits all” image it has in the world?

Grace: I think this reflection comes from what they teach in schools in Japan. I feel like there’s always been a pressure for all the students to be the same. Japanese schools deny the concept of diversity and force students to look and think alike. I wonder how many parents in Japan teach their children about diversity. It is very rare that Japanese children are exposed to dolls or princesses or dark skinned characters like me. Most people have only seen the same skin tone and hairstyle since they were young. So, I suspect that this childhood environment is also to blame for this misunderstanding of Japan as homogeneous.

6. What has been the response to the film so far?

Ishijima: Ever since Mosaic Street came out on YouTube, the response from people has been amazing. Some viewers didn’t know we were transgender actresses and were fascinated by our existence. I really hope that one day soon, I will be able to expand our activities in various media as an “actress”.

7. Would you agree that transgender celebrities here are often pressured into outlandish TV personas and almost never include trans men, which ironically leads to less diversity?

Ishijima: I am okay. When I came back to Japan in 2008, we were called “New Hafu” [“New Half”]. But this term no longer exists. I am troubled by this situation. The Japanese entertainment world is quite backward and doesn’t take risks. This is one of the reasons Yuki stood up. I was lucky.

Ami Ide as Mayumi Ando

8. Japan also has plenty of movies and shows about gay people, but very few mainstream stories about lesbians. Why do you think that is?

Idea: I don’t know why we don’t see a lot of lesbian shows. We don’t even see openly gay women in Japan. Maybe it’s because the film industry in general is male-dominated. Most lesbian actresses are in the closet. I’m sure the industry tells them they can’t do it if they’re openly gay. I remember one lesbian movie I saw and it was all directed by the male gaze, so I was very disappointed. They need to start hiring more lesbian or female directors.

9. Mosaic Street is set in the near future where being “Japanese” is no longer defined by a person’s skin color, sexual orientation, or gender identity. How to make this world a reality?

Grace: Mixed-race Japanese like me are normally treated as foreigners. We are not even allowed to audition for “Japanese” roles. Even for the background actors, we don’t see mixed-race Japanese. I would like to continue playing “normal” Japanese characters, not because I want to, but because I have to, to change, little by little, the current lack of diversity in the Japanese industry. Because we don’t appear on screen, Japanese viewers don’t even realize that what they see on screen actually lacks diversity. But in our daily life, we exist and we see many ethnicities in Japanese classrooms. Unless they notice the discrepancy between what they present in the media and what we see in reality, they will not invite us to any audition.

10. What are your hopes and dreams for the future?

Grace: I want Japan to accept its diversity and start creating movies and TV shows that can compete internationally. I want to be part of this movement to realize this dream. I want to appear in such diverse projects and I also want to perform.

Ishijima: Just like in the world of Mosaic Street, I hope that one day soon, even terms like “LGBTQ” will no longer exist and we will be one.

Idea: I had never seen people like me on TV in Japan because they had never played roles. I want kids to see me in an art form (through music or in movies) and think it could be them.

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A First for Malaysia: Anti-Sexual Harassment Short Film Wins Asian Pacific Cinema Award at Busan Film Festival | Showbiz https://fauve.info/a-first-for-malaysia-anti-sexual-harassment-short-film-wins-asian-pacific-cinema-award-at-busan-film-festival-showbiz/ Mon, 09 May 2022 07:18:11 +0000 https://fauve.info/a-first-for-malaysia-anti-sexual-harassment-short-film-wins-asian-pacific-cinema-award-at-busan-film-festival-showbiz/ Anti-sexual harassment short film “The Boys Club” won the Asian Pacific Cinema Award at the Busan International Short Film Festival. — Photo courtesy of Chen Yih Wen KUALA LUMPUR, May 9 — Malaysian filmmaker Chen Yih Wen The boys club won the Documentary Award at the 39th Busan International Short Film Festival. The documentary filmmaker […]]]>

Anti-sexual harassment short film “The Boys Club” won the Asian Pacific Cinema Award at the Busan International Short Film Festival. — Photo courtesy of Chen Yih Wen

KUALA LUMPUR, May 9 — Malaysian filmmaker Chen Yih Wen The boys club won the Documentary Award at the 39th Busan International Short Film Festival.

The documentary filmmaker and journalist won the Network for the Promotion of Asia-Pacific Cinema (Netpac), the first award for a Malaysian documentary.

The boys club follows Chen’s journey in directing his first feature-length documentary and reveals his harrowing experience of sexual harassment, bullying and misogyny.

“I’m honored by the festival’s recognition at our world premiere.”

“As a journalist myself, it was even more meaningful to receive the news on World Press Freedom Day,” Chen said in a statement.

According to her, media freedom is one of the issues highlighted in The boys club.

“Journalists should not be harassed at their workplace or for doing their job.

Chen and his executive producers hope to use the film for a greater cause — providing an educational toolkit for sexual harassment awareness and pushing for a more comprehensive anti-sexual harassment bill.

Chen is working with the Women’s Aid Organization on the film’s impact campaign.

She is also working with award-winning Indonesian film producer Mandy Marahimin to run a similar campaign in Indonesia.

The Netpac Award is given at select international film festivals to promote Asian cinema, highlight outstanding films and discover new talent.

The boys club will premiere in Oceania at Doc Edge Festival 2022, an Oscar-qualified international documentary festival, which will celebrate its 17th edition as a hybrid, indoor and online festival with 113 films over 40 days, from June 1 to July 10, 2022.

The documentary will also make its US premiere at the 21st San Francisco Documentary Festival, as part of the Short 7: She dares to challenge program.

It will also be made available to Malaysian audiences through virtual cinema.

Tickets can be purchased on the festival website here.

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I didn’t mean it to be a public service announcement https://fauve.info/i-didnt-mean-it-to-be-a-public-service-announcement/ Sat, 07 May 2022 17:58:58 +0000 https://fauve.info/i-didnt-mean-it-to-be-a-public-service-announcement/ Filmmaker Sumit Purohit says his latest short ‘Vakeel Babu’, slated to premiere at the Indian Film Festival in New York, deals with the issue of gender-based violence without being preachy in its approach. The short film aims to spark a conversation about the critical role lawyers play in the lives of clients seeking justice against […]]]>

Filmmaker Sumit Purohit says his latest short ‘Vakeel Babu’, slated to premiere at the Indian Film Festival in New York, deals with the issue of gender-based violence without being preachy in its approach.

The short film aims to spark a conversation about the critical role lawyers play in the lives of clients seeking justice against gender-based violence, particularly domestic violence. Produced by Civic Studios and co-produced by TrainTripper Films, the legal drama stars actors Abhishek Banerjee, Bhamini Oza Gandhi and Lovleen Mishra.

Purohit, screenwriter and editor of the acclaimed ‘Scam 1992: The Harshad Mehta Story’, said his challenge as director was to edit the short in a way that it makes his point but doesn’t come across as sermonic. .


“We always knew the movie had a message, but how do you disguise it so it doesn’t start to look like our characters are speaking directly to the audience. Because then it becomes a public service announcement, what we didn’t do ‘ I don’t want to.”

“So you hide it through your frames, your music, and your edits. A lot of effort went into making every detail authentic. The movie had to look real,” the director said.

According to the makers, the film traces the journey of lawyer Shiraz Hassan (Banerjee), who is distracted by the pursuit of success through his digital video channel, then “is approached online by an anonymous victim with a powerful attacker – will- take- the deal?”

Purohit joined the project when the basic script for the film – by Kanishka and Suyash Barve – was in place. The team recreated a small town located in Mumbai and shot the film in three days last October.”

Purohit, who made his directorial debut with the 2010 documentary “I woke up one morning and found myself famous,” said the film is about domestic violence and the role of lawyers in such cases.

“It’s not just about knowing the law, it’s about knowing how you treat the victim. It’s not just about telling them about the law, but also understanding where they’re coming from. Often , it’s about the written law rather than human interactions… That’s what we meant.What also happened with OTT is that the approach to storytelling is determine if your content can resonate with global audiences.


“It’s important that you start telling local stories, either it’s telling a local issue or it’s set in a local mythology or politics. What the film is about is probably a global issue, but my approach, with the music, his background is very local,” he added.

Anushka Shah, producer and founder of Civic Studios, said the idea with “Vakeel Babu” was to balance “the idea of ​​entertainment and empowerment”.

“We also had to make sure it was a contemporary story, which is relevant for today. The character we created is based on many real lawyers, who use their social media presence to collect an audience, spread the information. We met with some of them to make the treatment realistic,” she said.

Shah said the research included reviewing more than 50 academic papers, which “carefully explored” the issue of domestic violence and ways to address it.

The team also interviewed more than 120 people, including victims of domestic violence, lawyers, judges, police officers and NGO workers, to understand the reality.

“We worked backwards from that to figure out what the problem is and some ways out of it,” Shah added.

Purohit, whose writing credits also include Prime Video’s popular ‘Inside Edge’ series, said ‘Vakeel Babu’ is an ‘Indian film at heart’ and is curious to see how American audiences react to it. .

But the director insists that although the short is set on a topical subject, he is not “making any change” in society with his art, but simply getting people to think and start a conversation.


“Films can bring solutions, launch debates and question. But as a filmmaker, I don’t see myself as an activist, I understand my privilege. I create, I do something that is a very complacent job… “

“Our film ends where the debate should begin. I don’t understand the legal system, I can just ask them questions and give people something to debate,” he added.

[With Inputs From PTI]

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A group of students prepare the premiere of a short film https://fauve.info/a-group-of-students-prepare-the-premiere-of-a-short-film/ Thu, 05 May 2022 15:25:32 +0000 https://fauve.info/a-group-of-students-prepare-the-premiere-of-a-short-film/ Ava ChuppePersonal editorachuppe@murraystate.edu The TV Club will premiere its short film, “Grief,” at the Curris Center Theater on May 7 at 1 p.m. At the end of each school year, TV Club usually presents the short films they made during the fall and spring semesters. However, the pandemic has derailed this tradition for two years. […]]]>

Ava Chuppe
Personal editor

achuppe@murraystate.edu

The TV Club will premiere its short film, “Grief,” at the Curris Center Theater on May 7 at 1 p.m.

At the end of each school year, TV Club usually presents the short films they made during the fall and spring semesters. However, the pandemic has derailed this tradition for two years.

The short film, which will be free and open to the public, explores the five stages of grief. Jayson, the film‘s protagonist, is a student who attends therapy sessions while struggling to cope with the death of his girlfriend.

Freshman vocal performance major Zacharie Lamb, who wrote and helped direct the short, began writing the screenplay during the Christmas holidays.

“It’s been so awesome, because I’m a freshman myself, so I never expected to be in a position like I’m in now,” Lamb said.

Lamb said the goal when writing the film was to humanize the subject of grief, so it’s not as difficult for people to discuss it.

“The goal was to create a very human and honest portrayal of grief,” Lamb said. “There’s no generic way to do this.”

Junior Music Major Alec Wadley, who plays Jayson, was featured in the recent Theater Arts Program production of “Murder on the Orient Express” alongside Lamb. “Grief” is Wadley’s first experience in front of a camera, despite appearing in several live theatrical performances.

“It was instructive to not only know how to act, but also to see what is happening behind [the camera]”Wadley said.

Psychology major Leah Harley, the film’s female lead, said she was honored to be a part of the project.

“My experience directing the film was an absolute blast,” Harley said. “It’s a lot of work, because we all sacrifice a lot of our time to do it, but every shoot has been so fun and light.”

Harley said the film is relatable because everyone will cry or have cried at some point in their lives.

“I hope everyone understands the importance of hugging the ones you love a little more, because you never know what day will be their last,” Harley said.

TV Club president Ashley Jones said a lot of things needed to be done for the film to happen.

“Besides the director and the videographer, there’s no role that the same person works in every time,” Jones said. “I helped with audio, lighting and even spoke to the director and videographer to suggest different shot ideas for the film.”

At the end of each school, Jones said it was exciting to present a short film again at the Curris Center.

“I encourage students and other members of the campus community to get out there,” Jones said. “It means a lot to students to see the work they’ve done being shown on the big screen and people coming and watching.”

Lamb added that interested students should be on the lookout for other TV Club projects.

“We have more plans in the future to do shorts with the same team, and there have been a lot of brilliant ideas for the next semester,” Lamb said.

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The short film at the Tribeca Film Festival https://fauve.info/the-short-film-at-the-tribeca-film-festival/ Wed, 04 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://fauve.info/the-short-film-at-the-tribeca-film-festival/ Photo credit: Dimitrios Kambouris – Getty Images Taylor Swift arrives in Tribeca. Well, sort of: she’ll be speaking at the Tribeca Film Festival about Very good: The short movie. Swift directed, produced and wrote the film and made an appearance at the very end. Titled “A Conversation with Taylor Swift,” the event will take place […]]]>

Photo credit: Dimitrios Kambouris – Getty Images

Taylor Swift arrives in Tribeca. Well, sort of: she’ll be speaking at the Tribeca Film Festival about Very good: The short movie. Swift directed, produced and wrote the film and made an appearance at the very end.

Titled “A Conversation with Taylor Swift,” the event will take place at the Beacon Theater (not in Tribeca) on Saturday, June 11 at 3 p.m. EST. After a screening of the film, Swift will “discuss her approach as a filmmaker.”

The film premiered in November 2021, starring Sadie Sink and Dylan O’Brien, and is based on the 10-minute version of Swift’s 2012 song “All Too Well.” The 10-minute version of the song was released on her album Red (Taylor’s version), and it’s widely believed to be about Swift’s relationship with actor Jake Gyllenhaal.

Of the film, Swift wrote on her Instagram, “I can’t begin to express my gratitude to Sadie and Dylan for giving us everything they had to tell this story…For you, from us. ♥

In addition to Swift, other talks at the Tribeca Film Festival include Pharrell Williams, Cynthia Erivo, Seth Meyers, W. Kamau Bell and Tig Notaro, plus a 50th anniversary retrospective of The Godfather with an introduction with Al Pacino.

“We are thrilled to present a compelling roster of talks, meetings and masterclasses from leading storytellers from film, television, music, art and comedy,” said Paula Weinstein, director of Tribeca content, in a statement. “Audiences will have the opportunity to hear a diverse and captivating lineup of award-winning artists at the forefront of cultural leadership.”

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The hat becomes the backdrop for a short film https://fauve.info/the-hat-becomes-the-backdrop-for-a-short-film/ Mon, 02 May 2022 15:07:26 +0000 https://fauve.info/the-hat-becomes-the-backdrop-for-a-short-film/ Medicine Hat takes center stage in the first production by a Saskatchewan filmmaker. Brysen Mann, author, screenwriter and director, will make his directorial debut with the short film The Price Tag, shot entirely in Medicine Hat. “The Price Tag is gritty drama with a touch of humor,” Mann told The News. “It is the story […]]]>

Medicine Hat takes center stage in the first production by a Saskatchewan filmmaker.

Brysen Mann, author, screenwriter and director, will make his directorial debut with the short film The Price Tag, shot entirely in Medicine Hat.

“The Price Tag is gritty drama with a touch of humor,” Mann told The News. “It is the story of a hardened individual, Ray, who plans to rob a bar owned by Jeff, a hard-working family man. During their interaction, they share, sometimes reluctantly, a few ideas about themselves and find common ground.

Filming for the project began in January and largely focused on exterior shots. Unforeseen circumstances resulted in a two-month hiatus from filming, but Mann and his team are scheduled to return to Medicine Hat in May and wrap up filming in June.

Mann said he chose Medicine Hat as his film‘s backdrop in large part because of the vibrant murals that decorate the city’s downtown core and will be captured in several exterior shots.

After choosing the city as the location, Mann contacted the local media arts and design organization, Pulp. Digital creators.

“They really helped me allocate and find a film crew. They helped me scout out locations and additional filming equipment needs and everything,” Mann said. was not only a great experience, but also very lucky that Medicine Hat has a resource like this to support people doing projects like mine.

“Additionally, there has been a wide range of businesses and individuals…who have been extremely helpful to this project, so I very much appreciate Medicine Hat as a location and (for its) resources. Without their participation, I would not have seen this project as rewarding and successful as it has been so far.

Mann is also grateful to his six-person film crew, five of whom are from Medicine Hat.

“We have a great film crew which currently includes April Mandziak, James Kuehn, Benjamin Weir, Jessika Babe, Neil Braun and Rachelle Mandziak,” he said. “The entire film crew that participates is extremely talented.”

Mann also hopes to find a local actor to fill one of the film’s speaking roles.

“I’m hoping to find (an actor) as local as possible, but if not in Medicine Hat, definitely in Alberta.”

Local is an important aspect of Mann’s work.

“I reside in Saskatchewan, but I am a former resident of Alberta,” he said. “But I’m going back to Alberta next year because I want (future) film projects to be based in Alberta or Saskatchewan as much as possible, (in terms of) locations, cast and crew. . Just try to keep things local as much as possible.

The roughly 35-minute film is slated for release this summer. Mann hopes to share her work with audiences across Canada and the world, enrolling them in film festivals.

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Short film about women in the black leagues https://fauve.info/short-film-about-women-in-the-black-leagues/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:45:00 +0000 https://fauve.info/short-film-about-women-in-the-black-leagues/ GASTONIA, NC — A North Carolina woman brings a little-known part of history to the screen. What do you want to know Ashleigh Gilliam wrote her first screenplay during the pandemic Gilliam’s short film is about the three women who played in the black leagues Gilliam’s short film highlights the challenges Toni Stone, Connie Morgan […]]]>

GASTONIA, NC — A North Carolina woman brings a little-known part of history to the screen.


What do you want to know

  • Ashleigh Gilliam wrote her first screenplay during the pandemic
  • Gilliam’s short film is about the three women who played in the black leagues
  • Gilliam’s short film highlights the challenges Toni Stone, Connie Morgan and Mamie Johnson faced as trailblazers in the sport

In 2020, Ashleigh Gilliam wrote the script for a short film about three pioneering African-American women in baseball: Toni Stone, Connie Morgan and Mamie Johnson.

Her short “Toni. Grandma. Connie.” highlights the challenges they faced.

Before 1947, baseball was a separate sport, according to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

“The character I played Grandma Johnson. She couldn’t play for the All American [Girls Professional Baseball League] in the 40s and 50s because of his skin color,” Gilliam said.

The trio played with men in the black leagues. All three women played for the Indianapolis Clowns. Stone also played for the San Francisco Sea Lions, New Orleans Black Pelicans, New Orleans Creoles and Kansas City Monarchs, according to Major League Baseball.

Gilliam became curious about the women pioneers after watching the movie “A League Apart,” which focuses on the All American Girls Professional Baseball League.

A scene from the film shows a black woman returning a ball to a league player during a game. This caused Gilliam to question why black players are noticeably absent from the film and began to investigate.

“Once I found out that these three women were people or characters that I hadn’t heard of at 29, I mean I couldn’t think of a better way to give them that recognition than to tell their stories,” Gilliam said.

Last year, Gilliam starred in the short and directed it with support from assistant directors Samantha Hawkins and Monica Cooper.

It was shot on a softball field at Belmont Abbey College and at Gilliam’s grandmother’s house in Gastonia.

“It’s also a great way to showcase my home and the place where I grew up,” Gilliam said.

Gilliam earned a minor in Theater Arts at UNC-Chapel Hill. She has already acted but this is her first screenplay.

She hopes one day to be able to combine actress and screenwriter in one job.

“I have a voice that needs to be heard,” Gilliam said.

Featuring “Toni. Grandma. Connie.” she wanted to shed light on the history of her generation and the generation of her children.

“Just so they can show they can do whatever they set their mind to,” Gilliam said.

In the fall, Gilliam held the premiere of his eight-minute film.

She has now submitted it to be considered for awards at over 10 film festivals across the country.

In North Carolina, she submitted it to the North Carolina Film Festival, which takes place this summer. In addition, she submitted it to the Raleigh Film and Art Festival, which will take place in the fall.

The short will be available to stream later this year.

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